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Showing posts from December, 2020

One Habit resolution

New Years resolutions and habits  Today is December 31st. Tonight 50% of American adults will make a New Years resolution. By February 28th 90% of them will have broken their resolution. I know New Years resolutions don’t work so I don’t set them. Instead I build a new habit on the first of each month. Normally I will pick a specific habit that will help with a goal I have. For example if I want to improve my mindfulness I will work on creating a habit of meditating for 5 minutes every morning. The habits I work on are very deliberate. This has been my approach for years. Keystone habits  There is another, more organic approach though. This is to build “keystone habits.” I first learned of keystone habits in Charles Duhiggs excellent book called “The Power of Habit.” The idea is you build an initial habit that will then trigger more habits. For example the keystone habit of walking 10,000 steps a day develops in to going for a 5k run to going to the gym and lifting weights. This year I

A better alternative to New Years resolutions

Every January half of American adults create “New Years Resolutions.” They resolve to make good changes like going to the gym every day, losing weight or being happier. Sadly studies have shown that 90% of those people give up on their resolution by February! I believe the reason people fail is they are resolving to make a huge change for an entire year without a way to actually achieve the change. So, if you are one of the people who would like to make a change for the good, what should you do? My suggestion is that instead of making one big resolution you more than likely won’t stick to, resolve to make six smaller habits through out the year instead. Research has shown that at least 40% of our daily actions are based on habits and routines, not newly formed decisions. If you concentrate on forming habits throughout the year you can make changes that will stick. Researchers at MIT found that a habit has 3 parts – a reminder, the routine and a reward. The reminder is what triggers you

How to do the 5MX Moving Exercise routine.

5MX is a routine of 5 Mindful Exercises. It was inspired by the Canadian Airforces 5BX exercise program in the 1960s. Instead of focusing on cardio 5MX involves gentle stretching exercises and mindfulness however. I created the 5MX because I wanted something simple that I could do which would give me the benefits of yoga, tai chi and meditation but I could learn and do anywhere without going to a class. The 5MX routine only takes 5 minutes and its a great way to start the day. Anyone can learn 5MX and it can be done anywhere. Doing 5MX will help you feel calm and relaxed and ready to take on the day after doing 5MX. The exercises in 5MX combine physical movement and mindfulness. They help you be aware of your body and help with concentration. Mindfulness has been shown to measurably improve ones mental wellbeing. MX 1 1. Stand up straight, feet in a slight V and hands by side with palms facing forward. Close your eyes and slowly breath in through your nose paying attention to the sensa